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Wolf #3
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Caribou are foundational to the history, culture, and stories of Inuit in Labrador, as they are connected socially, mentally, emotionally, spiritually, and economically. However, this relationship has been changing in recent years as the caribou herds in Labrador, and in particular the George River Caribou Herd (GRCH), have experienced rapid population collapses and shifts in migration patterns. Once the largest herd in the world – numbering over 800,000 in the early 1990s – the GRCH has declined by almost 99 per cent and is now estimated to be under 9,000 caribou. To support the rebound of this herd, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador issued a total hunting ban on the GRCH in 2013, meaning Indigenous peoples are no longer legally allowed to harvest caribou for sustenance. Though the hunting ban may be seen as an answer to increase caribou numbers – or at least to halt the decline – this ban has also disrupted the historic relationship between people and caribou, which may have substantial effects on Inuit well-being. These photographs are part of a larger visual-oriented, community-based research project that is looking at the relationships between caribou and Inuit well-being in Labrador. They were taken during a filming trip around Nain, Labrador, through the guidance and support of the Torngat Secretariat, Bird's Eye Inc., and Universal Helicopters. 

Wolf #3
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Caribou #13
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Caribou #9-2
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Caribou #3-2
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Caribou #2
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